Xindu Urbex
Look out below!

Xindu Urbex

I have been lazy the past few days and lethargic. The lymph nodes on my neck under my chin are inflamed and I am fighting some kind of infection, but the good news is I have my own bed to rest in and I am getting more sleep at night than in ChengDu. Anyway, I will post about the last two days in one article.

Making Chinese Dumplings
Zoe is teaching me how to make dumplings!

So yesterday I woke up earlier than usual. I awoke at 9:30 AM after much needed sleep. We spent the morning making Chinese Dumplings. Zoe showed me the ingredients I needed to make dumplings for my family in America. The process, though long and tedious, made for a delicious lunch. After pinching the dough together for about 30 or 40 dumplings I finally got the process down quickly and efficiently. The pork, lettuce and chicken flavored seasoning from the inside of each dumpling caused an explosion of flavor in my mouth unfamiliar to my taste buds, but nonetheless scrumptious. Homemade dumplings beat anything from the market or restaurants.

After much debating for what to do with our afternoon we decided to take the 2:00 PM bus from Southwestern Petroleum University in Xindu back to ChengDu to meet up with Chris, Jelte, and Yezi. I used Strava to map the route of the bus ride back to ChengDu to find some cool Xindu urbex for today, but I ended up forgetting and roamed around the city aimlessly.

Making Chinese Dumplings
Just doing the long and tedious process of dumpling making 🙂

After an hour of passing out and drooling all over my jacket we arrived in ChengDu Tianfu Square and took the metro to Nijiaqiao station to meet up with the rest of the crew. Our original intentions changed to “Escape The Room” at the north gate of Sichuan University. The game is normally 100 Kwai per person, but they had a special going on for 35 Kwai per person. The object of the game is to work together with your group to find clues to escape the room. You have one hour to use the clues in the room to escape. Both English and Chinese are used in order to figure out how to open each of the locked boxes to get to the next room and eventually “ESCAPE!”

We spent more than an hour, but only made it into the next room. Zoe and I needed to catch a bus back to Xindu since the last bus leaves at 9:30 PM and they fill up rather quickly.

Making Chinese Dumplings
Ah success after making Chinese Dumplings. Let the eating begin!

I woke up this morning much later at 11:00 PM. I think I am finally getting over this cold. It might be due to the change in the temperature as it is getting much colder outside. Anyway, Molly, Zoe and I all took a bike ride around campus in a 3-seat bicycle. I felt extremely weird and awkward. The stress on my legs felt harder than walking, but nonetheless, I learned more about her university and the buildings in it.

Xindu Urbex
More rooftop photos

Zoe headed off to class around 2:30 and left me with the key so I could get back into the apartment. I took a much needed walk and enjoyed the Xindu urbex around the city. Before heading out on my 7 mile trek I decided to take the elevator up to the 27 floor of Zoe’s apartment. The roof, left wide open, made it easy to access. I just walked up the steps and through the open glass door like I owned the place. A lot of people left their laundry on lines to dry on the rooftop because of the bright sunny day outside. I on the other hand took pictures from each corner of the skyscraper. Once I realized I could climb a ladder to gain another 10 feet I placed my orange and drink down on the ground and clasped the metal ladder with both hands planting my feet against the slippery, tiled wall. I pulled myself up and climbed the ladder until reaching the top where an open, cement rooftop laid for me to be on top of the world. I looked around and realized I set foot on the highest point of any skyscraper in the area. The cranes working on the skyscrapers to my left sat a few feet higher, but other than that, I remained on top of Xindu, China. It felt so exhilarating. Not from an adrenaline standpoint, but just very peaceful, like only a few people looked out over the city from this point.

Xindu Urbex
Look out below!

I quickly climbed down from the ladder. Both feet making a loud plop onto the concrete roof below my feet. As I walked around the front to head down to the ground floor I realized I just missed getting caught by a security guard on the roof. He didn’t notice me so I just roamed along on my merry way.

Xindu Urbex
Don’t look down 🙂

The walk around town seemed rather boring for the most part. I passed a temple that looked the same as all the other tourist attractions in the past so I did not bother to enter. I walked around Guishui Greenway, which despite the name, lacked the color green. The waterway appeared to be a murky, black, color. Either from the clay below or contamination. I am unsure. The architecture on this route appeared to be rather interesting. Xindu Media building shimmered in the sun. It’s light blue windows reflecting much light from the ground floor to more than 30 stories up. I wanted to enter, but despite roaming the rooftops in random cities, business entities seems like a stretch due to more security and less reason to be there. I will upload the route later so you can see the area I wandered from Strava. This app is great if you don’t speak Chinese. You can map out areas to walk or ride a bicycle and it even supplies both names in English and Chinese. So if you get tired, just show the taxi driver your return destination and he can read it in Chinese and take you there. It’s great! Check it out at the Google Playstore to make your Xindu urbex adventures even more fun!

Xindu Urbex
Hole in the wall?
Xindu Urbex
Near the Xindu Media building. The really tall one to the far left 🙂
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Brian Cray is not a cyclist. He’s not a hitchhiker. He’s not a train hopper or an adrenaline junkie. He’s just an ordinary man with gypsy blood in his veins, who can’t seem to settle down. Nothing defines him. He goes wherever this world takes him on this journey we call life, roaming the world, at will, by any means. He aspires for a life of indefinite travel, a tiny home in the woods for him and his wife, and any work that keeps him wanderin’. Brian Cray is a travel writer at heart, sharing his stories with the world one keystroke at a time.

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